End of Fixer Upper got you down? This will help.

In honor of Chip and Joanna I’m going to get my hands dirty and plant a landscape worthy of even a Waco Tudor.

Key Points

  • Joanna Gaines was my best friend and I’m going to miss her.
  • In honor of Fixer Upper, I’m going to fix up my landscaping.
  • Good landscaping can help you mourn Fixer Upper AND save energy.

Last week was a very sad day in my house. We laughed. We cried. We wondered how we ever lived without knowing what shiplap is. Our favorite show, Fixer Upper, ended.

But through the tears we will persevere.

In honor of Chip and Joanna I’m going to get my hands dirty and plant a landscape worthy of even a Waco Tudor.

If you also need some Fixer Upper therapy, check out these landscaping tips to ease your heartache and save on your energy bill while you’re at it.

Trees

According to the Department of Energy, carefully positioned trees can save up to 25% of the energy a typical household uses by providing shade and acting as a windbreak. In tree-shaded neighborhoods the summer daytime air temperature can be up to 6 degrees cooler than in treeless areas. And windbreaks to the north, west and east of houses cut fuel consumption by an average of 40 percent.

Shrubs

Groundcover plants like succulents and shrubs can cool the air before it reaches your home in the summer. Low shrubs on the windward side of your windbreak can also help trap snow before it blows next to your home in the winter.

Climbing vines

Consider shading your patio or deck with a trellis covered in climbing vines. It will help keep your outdoor living space cool, and cut down on the warm air that sneaks inside.

Need even more inspiration? Here’s a slideshow of 31 Fixer Upper-inspired curb appeal ideas to get you going. Now please pass the tissue (sniff, sniff).


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A. in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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