Five ways to save some money on laundry you might not have considered

I don’t know how it happened, but at some point my daughters started to expect their towels and pajamas to be pre-warmed for them in the dryer every night. So I take their Peppa ...

Tagged: Department of Energy, save energy, clothes dryer

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Five ways to save some money on laundry you might not have considered

Woman reaches in to dryer to retrieve clothes.

I’m pretty sure if the Energy Department knew I was using my clothes dryer to warm Annie’s footsie pajamas before bed, I’d make some sort of watch list.

Key Points

  • The Department of Energy has some new ideas for saving money on each load of laundry.
  • A couple options to save include using dryer balls and switching loads while the dryer is still warm.
  • It’s also a good idea to separate clothes by how heavy they are instead of just by color. Heavier clothes take longer to dry, so you might be using more energy than needed on the light stuff if they’re mixed together. 

I don’t know how it happened, but at some point my daughters started to expect their towels and pajamas to be pre-warmed for them in the dryer every night. So I take their Peppa Pig or Frozen themed flannels out of the drawers each evening, throw them into the dryer, and then present them for use at bedtime. This is then followed by back massages while I sing them personalized original songs highlighting the events of the day. #roughingit.

I know that this miiiiiight be a little extreme. But a recent article at energy.gov got me to thinking about just how much energy I’m wasting every night.

The article highlighted ways to save money on laundry. Some were expected, like wash with cold water, wash full loads, air dry, etc. But there were a few I hadn’t considered before, like these:

  • Use dryer balls. Wool or rubber dryer balls will help separate your clothes and get more air to them, cutting drying time. They can also reduce static so you don’t need dryer sheets. The wool balls are said to absorb some moisture, further cutting drying time.
  • Use the high-speed or extended spin cycle in the washer. This will remove as much moisture as possible before drying, reducing your drying time and the wear on your clothes from the high heat of the dryer.
  • Dry towels and heavier cottons separately from lighter-weight clothes. You’ll spend less time drying the lighter-weight clothes.
  • Switch loads while the dryer is warm. This will allow you to use the remaining heat inside the dryer for the next cycle.
  • Consider a natural gas dryer. Depending on gas and electric rates in your area, a gas dryer could cost less to operate, though it may cost a little more to purchase. Keep in mind a gas dryer does need a dedicated gas line.

I’m pretty sure if the Energy Department knew I was using my clothes dryer to warm Annie’s footsie pajamas before bed, I’d make some sort of watch list. These tips are a good reminder that I need to re-up my energy savings game.

First step: Start to throw the pajamas in at the end of a load of laundry that actually needs some drying.

Second step: Tell the girls that they might have to rough it with room-temperature pajamas from time to time. But don’t worry about them too much – we’ll keep the back massages and serenades in the routine.


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A. in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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The silver lining to your hail damage

Summer storms are notorious for spectacular lighting shows and damaging hail. Those ice balls are bad news for your tomato plants, and in more severe cases, they can do some serious ...

Tagged: Department of Energy, cool roof, Emissions, peak, temperature

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The silver lining to your hail damage

Contractor working on a roof

If you experienced hail damage to your roof this summer, consider installing a cool roof when you replace it.

Key Points

  • If you’re replacing a roof this summer, consider making it a cool one.
  • Cool roofs reflect the sunlight and absorb less heat.
  • A cool roof can be up to 50 degrees cooler than a conventional one.

Summer storms are notorious for spectacular lighting shows and damaging hail. Those ice balls are bad news for your tomato plants, and in more severe cases, they can do some serious damage to your vehicles and home.

If you experienced hail damage to your roof this summer, consider installing a cool roof when you replace it. It might help you save money on your energy bill next summer.

Think of a cool roof as your favorite basic white tee on a hot summer day. It helps keep you cool by reflecting the sunlight and absorbing less heat than your favorite dark hues. A cool roof made of reflective paint, sheet covering or shingles can keep your roof up to 50 degrees cooler than a conventional roof, making it much easier to keep your house cool.

Here are the benefits of a cool roof, according to the U.S. Department of Energy:

  • Reducing energy bills by decreasing air conditioning needs
  • Improving indoor comfort for spaces that are not air conditioned, such as garages or covered patios
  • Decreasing roof temperature, which may extend roof service life

Beyond the building itself, cool roofs can also benefit the environment, especially when many buildings in a community have them. Cool roofs can:

  • Reduce local air temperatures (sometimes referred to as the urban heat island effect)
  • Lower peak electricity demand, which can help prevent power outages
  • Reduce power plant emissions, including carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and mercury, by reducing cooling energy use in buildings

Find out more about the types of roof systems available.


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Save energy with this improvement to your garage

Sure, your garage is a great space to store extra toys, bikes, strollers and wagons. You might even be able to fit a car in there. But it could be costing you. That deceiving space ...

Tagged: insulation, save energy, garage, Department of Energy

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Save energy with this improvement to your garage

Residential garage door

Save energy costs and keep you and your family safe by insulating the space between your garage and house.

Key Points

  • Many garages aren’t insulated from the living spaces above them.
  • Warm air from the garage can leak into the house.
  • Make sure the space between the garage and living space is insulated. 

Sure, your garage is a great space to store extra toys, bikes, strollers and wagons. You might even be able to fit a car in there. But it could be costing you. That deceiving space seems like it’s inside. But chances are, it’s not air conditioned. So all that hot air in the garage might be making its way into your house, especially if you have living space above it.

Make sure the space between your garage and house is insulated. Not only will it save you on energy costs, but it will help keep you and your family safe from pollutants from car exhaust.

Here’s a great step-by-step guide on what to do from the Department of Energy. Check out more tips to get the job done here

Double-check your insulation

Before opening the packages, verify that the insulation material is the correct width and R-value.

Seal air gaps

Before insulating, carefully air seal gaps in the floor between the garage and the conditioned space as well as the garage and the outdoors (rim/band joists, for example). Use caulk for gaps smaller then ¼ inch and foam for gaps ¼ inch to 3 inches. In addition to improving energy efficiency, air sealing also helps keep exhaust fumes and other pollutants out of the conditioned space.

Fit insulation between joists

Make sure the insulation extends to the outside edge of each joist bay and is in contact with blocking or rim/band joist and the subfloor above. When using kraft-faced batts, install kraft facing against the conditioned side of the cavity. The kraft facing creates a vapor retarder that prevents trapped moisture from reducing the insulation's effectiveness.

Adjust insulation for a snug fit

Make sure the ends of insulation are butted snugly together and in full contact with the subfloor of the conditioned space above.

Fasten the insulation in place

Use wire fasteners to support the insulation so that it is in full contact with the subfloor but not compressed.


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Is the electric vehicle about to become the go-to family car?

I was perusing the U.S. Department of Energy’s website the other day (what, like you don’t?) and came across a great article on what life is really like with an electric vehicle. ...

Tagged: electric car, electric vehicle, Department of Energy, tax credits

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Is the electric vehicle about to become the go-to family car?

Green car word cloud

I explored buying an electric vehicle a couple years ago, but after crunching the numbers decided it wasn’t practical for my family.

Key Points

  • Considering an electric vehicle? Read this.
  • Today’s EVs fit two car seats and tall people. Really.
  • Federal and state tax credits might make it a good financial decision too.

I was perusing the U.S. Department of Energy’s website the other day (what, like you don’t?) and came across a great article on what life is really like with an electric vehicle. With kids. And a tall husband. Check out the whole article here

Here are a few highlights:

Can it charge with a regular outlet?

“Yes! I didn't realize our car would plug into the same type of outlet that we use for our microwave, but sure enough. The typical 120 volt household outlet can provide a Level 1 charge for an electric car. You can install a 240 V outlet — like the kind used for hot tubs or other large loads — for a faster, Level 2 charge.”

Can it fit two car seats?

“And more. Both of my kiddos, my 6'3" husband, me and my massive purse, and our hiking gear can comfortably fit into the car together. In fact, my daughter sometimes complains that she can't reach her brother for hand holding, toy taking or general sibling shenanigans.”

But doesn’t it cost a lot more than buying a gas-powered car?

“That’s not necessarily the case. I mean, if you want the new Tesla Model X (and who doesn’t?), then yeah, it probably does. But really, we felt like we were making the right financial decision when we purchased our EV. Here’s why. We became eligible for up to $7,500 in federal and $6,000 in state tax credits with the purchase of our car. This majorly contributed to a reasonable bottom line. Already, the cost was in line with other new cars when these rebates were taken into account. Add to that the 30 percent discount as part of Solar Benefits Colorado and 0 percent financing over six years — which were both active deals when we bought our car — and we’re actually going to be in the black for several months after filing our taxes. Crazy, huh?”

I explored buying an electric vehicle a couple years ago, but after crunching the numbers decided it wasn’t practical for my family. More on that here. Looks like I might have to reconsider when we’re ready to buy again.


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Wind turbines 101

Wind generation is expected to account for almost 6 percent of the U.S.’s total energy generation by 2017. That might not sound like much, but it represents an increase of more ...

Tagged: renewable energy, wind energy, wind turbine, Department of Energy

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Wind turbines 101

Wind turbine up close

Wind Energy has been around for centuries. As early as 5000 B.C., Egyptians used wind energy to propel boats on the Nile River.

Key Points

  • Wind generation is on the rise.
  • Wind energy was used as early as 5000 B.C. by the Egyptians.
  • Check out this graphic to learn how wind turbines work.

Wind generation is expected to account for almost 6 percent of the U.S.’s total energy generation by 2017. That might not sound like much, but it represents an increase of more than 24-fold since the turn of the century.

If you’ve ever passed a semi-truck hauling a commercial wind blade down the highway, you can appreciate just how huge these devices are. But how exactly do they work?

The Department of Energy has a nice interactive graphic that helps explain each part of a wind turbine. It also offers some interesting facts. For instance, as early as 5000 B.C., Egyptians used wind energy to propel boats on the Nile River.

We’ve come a long way since then, with modern wind turbines using the latest technology to harness the wind’s power.

Here’s a snapshot by the numbers: 

  • 100 – Feet above ground where most turbines can take advantage of faster wind speeds found at higher altitudes.
  • 55 – Miles per hour wind speed when a turbine’s controller will stop a rotor from turning to avoid damage in high winds.
  • 2 – Types of basic wind turbines: those with a horizontal axis and those with a vertical axis. A majority of turbines are the horizontal variety.
  • 4,000 – Number of gigawatts of technical resource potential of the winds above U.S. coastal waters.
  • 15 million – Number of U.S. homes we have enough wind power capacity to power.

Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Office drama resolved: The battle of the thermostat

We’ve all been there. You’re working at your desk in what feels like a deep freeze because the guys down the hall keep hijacking the thermostat. Or your mom comes over and complains ...

Tagged: Home Heating, cooling, Department of Energy

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Office drama resolved: The battle of the thermostat

Tired businessman

Our approach to heating and cooling doesn’t make sense. We try to find a temperature for the entire building that suits everyone.

Key Points

  • Our current approach to heating and cooling focuses on the temperature of the air.
  • We could save energy if we focused more on individual comfort.
  • Some new prototypes include a personal robot, temperature-controlled clothes, and an office chair with heaters and coolers.

We’ve all been there. You’re working at your desk in what feels like a deep freeze because the guys down the hall keep hijacking the thermostat. Or your mom comes over and complains that your house is a sauna even though you think the room feels comfortable. (She’s probably just overheated from hauling that box of wine up the stairs. Or is that just the case at my house?)

Box wine aside, all this temperature drama results because our approach to heating and cooling doesn’t make sense. We try to find a temperature for the entire building that suits everyone.

Not only does this lead to grumpy co-workers and a grandma who thinks ice cubes in wine is a good idea, it also wastes lots of energy. The conference room is being heated even if no one is meeting in there. At home, your bedroom is staying at an ideal temperature even though the whole family is hanging out in the living room.

The Department of Energy is working on changing that approach. They challenged engineers to come up with a way to heat people, not air. Some of the first prototypes from this challenge were unveiled recently and included things like a personal robot that follows you around blowing air at a temperature of your choice, clothing with tiny capillaries that carry warmed or cooled air through them, and a chair with built-in heating and cooling elements that let you regulate your personal space like a boss.

You can read more about all of them here.

Do you have any other ideas on how we could heat/cool people, not air? And no, mulled wine is not an acceptable answer, Mom. 


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Department of Energy takes cue from Lindsey Lohan

Lindsey Lohan originally won our hearts as the star of Disney’s “Parent Trap” reboot over a decade ago. I love “The Parent Trap.” What could be better than discovering ...

Tagged: Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Tips, Energy Department

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Department of Energy takes cue from Lindsey Lohan

Illustration of people wearing suits

Turns out executives from Whole Foods and Hilton give each other some great energy-efficiency tips.

Key Points

  • The Department of Energy is playing the parent trap.
  • Only it involves middle-aged executives, not adorable twin girls.
  • They trade places and give energy advice. Almost as challenge as trying to get your divorced parents to fall back in love. 

Lindsey Lohan originally won our hearts as the star of Disney’s “Parent Trap” reboot over a decade ago. I love “The Parent Trap.” What could be better than discovering that your divorced parents have kept your identical twin a secret from you your entire life, only to meet her at a summer camp? How could that storyline play out with anything but a happy ending?

The Department of Energy must be a big fan too. They just debuted their own version of the movie. Only instead of adorable girls, middle-aged men in suits trade places. And instead of tricking their divorced parents, the men go to task on each other’s energy-efficiency tactics. And you guessed it, mayhem ensues.

Joking aside, this is a very clever attempt to get industries to share ideas about how to save energy. Executives from Whole Foods and Hilton give each other some great tips. And thanks to some very dramatic narration and music, it’s pretty fun to watch.

The season is available to view here.

Enjoy! 


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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How to find your energy tax credits, rebates and savings

It can be tricky to find all the tax credits, rebates and savings programs you’re eligible for. Many utilities offer programs that can help you save energy, and reduce the costs ...

Tagged: taxes, Energy Tax Incentives, Department of Energy, Energy Department, Energy Efficiency

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How to find your energy tax credits, rebates and savings

$100 dollar bill

It's tax time! Make sure you're claiming all of the tax credits you're eligible for.

Key Points

  • There are lots of programs to save you money on energy-efficient improvements to your property.
  • One website lets you search them all based on where you live and what kind of customer you are.
  • Happy searching.

It can be tricky to find all the tax credits, rebates and savings programs you’re eligible for. Many utilities offer programs that can help you save energy, and reduce the costs of new energy efficient purchases. Layer on programs from your town, county, state and the feds, and you might get carpel tunnel just thinking about it.

Luckily, www.energy.gov has a one-stop spot to get everything you need. Here it is. You can easily search for programs based on where you live and even sort it by who the program is intended to help.

And as a bonus, here’s a quick breakdown of the federal incentives for this year according to The Department of Energy:

  • Federal incentives are available for some building envelope, heating, cooling, and water heating products through 2016. Learn more.
  • Federal tax credits are available for solar energy systems through 2021, and for small wind electric systems, geothermal heat pumps, and fuel cells through 2016. Learn more.
  • Federal tax credits are available for all-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. Learn more.

Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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This resolution makes yours look small

Lose 10 pounds. Stop gossiping. Wear “real pants” on the weekends. 

These are all admirable New Year’s resolutions. But they can’t compare to what the U.S. ...

Tagged: Department of Energy, New Year's Resolution, New Year, Energy Efficiency, save energy

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This resolution makes yours look small

Happy New Year 2016

The Department of Energy is calling this the largest energy-saving standard in history.

Key Points

  • U.S. Department of Energy announced new efficiency standards for commercial air conditioners and furnaces.
  • It’s the largest energy-saving standard in history.
  • The DOE’s resolution is bigger than yours. 

Lose 10 pounds. Stop gossiping. Wear “real pants” on the weekends. 

These are all admirable New Year’s resolutions. But they can’t compare to what the U.S. Department of Energy is doing.

The DOE recently announced new efficiency standards for commercial air conditioners and furnaces. And they’re calling it the largest energy-saving standard in history. It’s projected to save businesses $167 billion on utility bills and reduce carbon pollution by 885 million metric tons. Not that losing 10 pounds isn’t hard, but well, this is more like Extreme Makeover for A/Cs and furnaces than just fitting into those skinny jeans (that you will wear on the weekends).

“Just days after the Paris agreement to cut global emissions and create a new era of affordable energy, today’s announcement marks the largest energy-saving standard in history and demonstrates that America is leading the effort to reduce energy costs and cut carbon emissions,” said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz in a press release. “This rule also shows that strong public-private partnerships can reap environmental and economic dividends and drive technology breakthroughs. These standards are a direct result of the Energy Department’s negotiated rulemaking process, which brings diverse stakeholders to the negotiating table and supports industry innovation, demonstrating how government and business can work together to meet U.S. carbon reduction goals.”

These new commercial air conditioning and furnace standards will occur in two phases. The first phase will begin in 2018 and will deliver a 13 percent efficiency improvement in products. Five years later, an additional 15 percent increase in efficiency is required for new commercial units.

Find more information about the energy efficiency standards for commercial air conditioners and warm air furnaces at www.Energy.gov.

Good luck with the pants. 


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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‘This store uses how much energy?’

A new invention may save half a billion dollars in energy costs every year.

An energy-efficient fan is now on the market, and grocers are hoping that it will significantly ...

Tagged: grocery store, Q-Sync, energy efficient, refrigeration, Department of Energy, Energy Department

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‘This store uses how much energy?’

Little girls at the grocery store

Grocers are hoping an energy-efficient fan will significantly reduce their refrigeration costs.

Key Points

  • Grocery stores use lots of energy.
  • A new invention may help stores save on refrigeration costs.
  • Small changes can lead to big savings. 

A new invention may save half a billion dollars in energy costs every year.

An energy-efficient fan is now on the market, and grocers are hoping that it will significantly reduce their refrigeration costs. Keeping all that food cool uses a lot of energy, so this is a big deal for grocery stores. 

The Department of Energy designated the new fan an “emerging energy-saving technology.” It was invented by Joe Flynn, co-founder and chief technology officer of QM Power. The Q-Sync motor saves energy by stripping down the motor design to keep it as simple as possible while still allowing it to get the job done.

According to Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, grocery stores are responsible for 9 percent of the total energy consumed by commercial buildings in the U.S. A single large commercial freezer can use up to 38,000 kilowatt-hours of power annually. 

In addition to installing new energy efficient fans like the Q-Sync, grocery stores can save energy by making simple changes to how they display food and what lights they use.

Is your store energy efficient? If not, here’s a helpful resource if you want to lobby to make your vegetables more green.

I know two little cuties who will join your team.  



Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Can hackers cut our power?

Cybersecurity is a big deal. It’s not easy staying safe from the bad guys.

Case in point: USA Today recently reported ...

Tagged: hacker, Grid, cyberattacks, Department of Energy, power system

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Can hackers cut our power?

Cyber hacker

The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology is examining vulnerabilities of the national grid. The Energy Department is also on it.

Key Points

  • Hackers are trying to compromise the grid.
  • There were 1,131 cyberattacks to the Department of Energy’s computer systems during a four-year period.
  • It’s a real threat, but lots of people are working to keep our power system safe.

Cybersecurity is a big deal. It’s not easy staying safe from the bad guys.

Case in point: USA Today recently reported that hackers made it into the Department of Energy’s computer systems more than 150 times from October 2010 to October 2014. Yikes.

Here’s what you need to know:

  • The numbers: There were 1,131 cyberattacks from October 2010 to October 2014. Of those, 159 were successful.
  • The expert opinion: “The potential for an adversary to disrupt, shut down (power systems), or worse … is real here,” said Scott White, Professor of Homeland Security and Security Management and Director of the Computing Security and Technology program at Drexel University. “It’s absolutely real.”
  • The plan: The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology is examining vulnerabilities of the national electric grid. The Energy Department is also on it. It has an Office of Electric Delivery & Energy Reliability doing lots of things to keep the grid safe — including doing lots of research.
  • The silver lining: The attacks on the Department of Energy’s computer systems weren’t to the grid directly. Utilities own and operate the grid and provide another line of defense to keep it safe.

Black Hills Corp. and other electric utilities, what are you doing to keep our grid safe?


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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Algae to fuel 101

President Obama’s Clean Power Plan has lots of people talking about renewable energy. But here’s a renewable source you probably haven’t considered: algae. Turns out it’s ...

Tagged: renewable energy, algae, Department of Energy, clean power plan

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Algae to fuel 101

Bottles of algae

Algae produces about 60 times more oil per acre than land-based plants.

Key Points

  • Algae could be a good source of energy.
  • Oils from algae can be converted into biofuel.
  • Researchers are working on finding the best way to make algae an affordable form of energy. 

President Obama’s Clean Power Plan has lots of people talking about renewable energy. But here’s a renewable source you probably haven’t considered: algae. Turns out it’s good for more than just junking up your boat.

Algae converts sunlight into energy, some in natural oils. This oil can be converted into biofuel. It’s really good at it too, producing about 60 times more oil per acre than land-based plants. But wait, there’s more! It also needs carbon dioxide to grow, so it actually cleans up the air. All for just $19.95 a month, plus shipping and handling. Just kidding. We don’t know how much it costs because it’s still a long way from commercial production. The Department of Energy is working on finding the most efficient ways to use this fuel source.

Here’s a good two-minute video explaining the whole deal. And yes, you should definitely bust out the fact that there are more than 100,000 different strains of algae at your next dinner party. It’ll be a big hit, I promise.

 


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the entire world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned an M.A.in Political Science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the Governor’s Office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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